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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the fiscal cliff debate. tax rates spike and spending slashed. congress is breaking for the holidays in two weeks. it could send the economy spinning in directions. $1.6 trillion in tax hikes. he will travel to pennsylvania to sell it to you. republicans aren't buying it. listen to house speaker, john boehner. >> despite the claims the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. >> democrats are firing right back at boehner. harry reid getting a little personal. >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> ouch. athena jones live from washington. same old same old. where do we go from here? >> that's the big question. the nice talk after the election is pretty much gone away. you mentioned one of the big sticking points, that's taxes. republicans and democrats can't agree on how to raise the tax revenue? end the bush tax cuts for the wealthy, close the loopholes, raise the capital gains taxes or all of the above. right now, they can't agree on how much money should be raised on the revenue side. let's listen to
over that so-called fiscal cliff. tax hikes and spending cuts kick in if no agreement is reached between the house and republicans on how to close the budget gap. it has been more than two weeks since president obama invited the major players to the white house to discuss the situation. as of this morning, no new talks are scheduled. brianna keilar joins us. so many republicans say they are pessimistic about a deal happening in time to avert this fiscal cliff. some say it's for political reasons. what can you tell us? >> it may all be for political reasons. that's no surprise in washington. as you can seen through dealmaking not just on this but things in the past couple of years between the white house and congress, there is almost this rhythm that has evolved. both sides are pointing to the other for an impasse. republicans like senator lindeyy graham just slamming the white house and tim geithner for a plan he laid out on behalf of the administration, laying out about $1.6 trillion in new revenues coupled with only about $400 billion in medicare cuts. listen to what graham sai
ourselves about to go off the fiscal cliff with the automatic spending cuts, in part is because back in 2011, they wanted to raise the debt ceiling and the republicans said you cannot do it unless we do spending cuts. we cannot just do deficit spending. so they agree, they cut this deal, now the democrats are going to the republicans and saying, forget that. let's just in the position to get rid of it. what on earth would make them think that republicans would agree to that? >> because the president thinks he has a mandate from the whole country. he thinks he can get anything he wants. i am sure that alan colmes loves this idea. here are the problems. the congress has the authority to authorize the debt. they also have the authority to authorize the bill that pays the debt. so now the president wants to take that away. this guy has shown a tendency to say that i don't need congress. i can pass laws with a stroke of a pen on executive orders. he doesn't need the supreme court because he declares laws unconstitutional, like doma. he says he wants an unlimited credit card, and you all will have
to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff at the end of this month. a series of tax cuts and spending cuts set to kick in just 26 shopping days until the fiscal cliff. >> brian: less working days. >> steve: that's right. house republicans say there will be no deal if tax ritz go up and the obama administration says it's ready to go thelma and louise style over the cliff on january 1. if that's the case, wendell goler live at the white house with what we know is going on behind the scenes. anything happening? >> steve, the president and house speaker john boehner talked on the phone yesterday, but they agreed not to characterize their conversation. so it's unclear how much progress they made. from the outside, it does seem they've moved a bit closer with boehner now agreeing to raise tax collection from the wealthy, though not by raising tax rates. >> we've got to cut spending and i believe to put revenues on the table. the revenues we're putting on the table will come from, guess who, the rich! there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes, and have the same people pay more of their mone
is spending. no one wants to talk about spending. the fiscal cliff is a bipartisan compromise that would do draconian cuts in the budget they never wanted in the first place. it's foolish to think congress will have a plan to fix things when congress designed the plan they are trying to fix. >> some democrats say entitlements can be on the table but should deal with long-term reform afterwards. here's what senator dick durbin said yesterday on "starting point." >> entitlements need to be part of the long-term strategy but do it in a thoughtful way. i don't want to see major changes decided in the heat of the moment. let's get through the fiscal cliff, find a way to avert it. but at the end of the day treat it as the important program it is for so many millions of americans. >> eric, if we get a deal, how much kicking of the can down the road do you think that deal will inclu include? >> i think it will include significant kicking the can down the road which is why they should kick the entire deal down the road and deal with it together. we know it won't from happen history. we have had 18 o
of this is that some people are trying to downplay the affects of the fiscal cliff saying if we go over for a few days it will be okay. ceos aren't saying that. you look at third quarter gdp, companies are spending less money on software and equipment because they don't know what's going to happen. the effects of the fiscal cliff are already holding back some things. >> of course. what stood out to me from howard schultz, the people that need it the most, the average american will feel this to the core. confidence is the corner stone. >> it makes you make decisions, big decisions, small decisions. i'm not going to buy that or do that, i'm scared to death. here's my question for the two of you. are more big ceos falling in line with the yes, let's raise the taxes on the 2%? >> if i don't know if a majority. would you say a majority? >> i think they want a deal and people have to make -- it's hard to make compromises. >> we've heard it from goldman sac sachs, warren buffett, schultz. >> big names there. >> they want clarity. the interesting thing to me, the stock market and bond market haven't freaked o
months of hearing about the fiscal cliff, there are no signs of a compromise plan. let's bring in senior congressional correspondent miss dana bash. dana? republicans say president obama's opening offer is, you know, all take and no give here. do they feel like the president is wasting their time? >> reporter: yes. they do. and, you know, a lot of times when we see this kind of toing and froing in public, don, it masks what is really going on behind the scenes, which is real negotiating. so i asked that question of john boehner, who has been through this kind of negotiating many, many times over many years, if that's what we're seeing or if we're at a stalemate. listen to this . the past 24 hours, is this the necessary public posturing that needs to go on to get an endgame or is there serious stalemate right now? >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult, but if you watched me over the last three weeks, i've been very girded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to
and looking at the fiscal cliff and talking about raising taxes that will not put a dent in the spending, so what is the answer? >> gretchen: the suggestion i make let's go back to the programs we had five or six years ago. there was a safety net five or six years ago. if you lost your job in 2006, you got some help but not the type of help people have got since then. we go back to that situation and maybe we have a hope much having a labor market go back to the way it was five or six years ago. >> gretchen: professor which politician, republican or democrat is going to be doing what you just said? >> not the ones from my district. >> gretchen: i mean, they are in eight bind are they not? republicans and democrats are in a bind. will be the one to come to the podium and say let's stop those unemployment benefits. >> it is a bind and the europeans worked it out before . they found helping for the unemployed is politically popular and economically damaging and they did it for decade upon decade and continue to do it. and so yeah, i am not optmistic that we will go back to where we were five ye
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)